Interview | Writer Naushena On Writing Styles & On Submitting Work To Journals

The Wire's Dream | BL | Black Lion Journal | Black Lion

I am humbly pleased to have interviewed Naushena for The Wire’s Dream 2nd Collection! Naushena is a writer whose voice carries through moments of tranquility with soft-spoken storytelling. Naushena loves to write poetry through which she expresses her feelings and emotions. She also writes essays sporadically. Her topics cover a wide range of subjects. Her work has been published in Five Poetry, Scarlet Leaf Review, Boston Literary Magazine, Mamalode, Mothers Always Write, EXPOUND and is forthcoming in few others.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
Hello there, Naushena! Thank you for taking your time to answer these questions. Let me begin by asking: How did you get started with your writing? What does writing mean to you?

NAUSHENA
Thank you so much for having me, I feel so honored. I started writing at a very young age but that was in the form of snippets and my personal diary. For me writing is an expression of one’s self and a vent through which we let out our feelings and emotions. It’s a powerful tool through which we can say much without saying.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
Those who write or who are creative in different ways often struggle with making time for doing what they love to do. How do you make time to do what you love to do?

Image of notebooks on a wooden outside table | Article Title: Interview | Writer Naushena On Writing Styles & On Submitting Work To Journals | From: The Black Lion Journal
“I always keep my journal handy and whenever I have an arrival of a poem or a subject to compose upon, I instantly jot it down.”

NAUSHENA
I believe a person can always take time out for anything he loves be it reading, writing or simply playing a game. I always keep my journal handy and whenever I have an arrival of a poem or a subject to compose upon, I instantly jot it down. Then the first thing I do in my free time is to compose upon it whether its day or 12 o clock at night.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
I know some writers like to draw inspiration from their personal lives, often using people they know as characters in their stories. Other writers that I know make a clear effort to separate their real life from their fictional creations. However, some writers that I know are in between and blend their real life seamlessly into their fictional creations! What about you? How does your personal life play into your writing process?

NAUSHENA
Our personal life is never personal but an influence of other people’s lives too. Our thinking and persona is shaped directly or indirectly by others. So like any other writer, my work especially poetry depicts my personal feelings towards life in general.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
You have a wonderful list of places in which your work has appeared and/or is forthcoming. What advice can you give novice writers about submitting their work?

NAUSHENA
I still consider myself as a novice! You need to have patience while and after submitting your work. It does not happen overnight since all publications have deadlines and reading periods. The editors do a painstaking job of reading innumerable submissions. It would be wise to read a copy of an issue to better know the editor’s taste and demand of a magazine. Moreover, all publications have certain guidelines which should be adhered to in order to have a better chance of acceptance.

“You need to have patience while and after submitting your work. It does not happen overnight since all publications have deadlines and reading periods.”

CHRISTINA LYDIA
In your bio you mention that you sporadically write essays. What about essay writing draws you the most? Which other genres, if any, do you like to delve into?

NAUSHENA
I am basically a poet and I accidentally discovered when I was a sophomore that I could write poems. I compose poems on anything that encompasses life. Poetry writing is concise and easier and it comes naturally to me. On the other hand, if there is too much to write on a subject then I have to write in the form of an essay.

Image of a tree in a grassy field | Article Title: Interview | Writer Naushena On Writing Styles & On Submitting Work To Journals | From: The Black Lion Journal
“One should always try to use a better phrase, for instance instead of calling your character brave, why not call him a lion?”

CHRISTINA LYDIA
Spread throughout “The Trees Where My Childhood Is Hanging” are snippets of beautifully crafted imagery, very much a skill that is often found in poetry. Is this a particular style that you have always used or did you learn to write this way? Is there any advice you can give writers who would also like to learn how to pack imagery within their own writing?

NAUSHENA
Being a Literature student, I was trained to embellish my writing with all the literary elements such as imagery, symbolism, personification, alliteration etc. When I write something I unconsciously use them because it’s drilled in my mind. Once a piece is complete, I do its critical appreciation and see what elements I have used and what can be altered. My advice to the aspiring writers is to do the same. Have your work be critiqued before submitting. One should always try to use a better phrase, for instance instead of calling your character brave, why not call him a lion? Don’t tell, let your words talk. Increase your vocabulary by a good amount of reading.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
Where would you like to see yourself, both personally and professionally, with your writing?

NAUSHENA
I still feel that I am on the first ladder of writing but I’d like to make my name through my writing in all the good magazines of all the continents. Getting a literary award is on my wish list too.

BL | Black Lion Journal | Black Lion

THANK YOU, Naushena, FOR ALLOWING US TO KNOW A BIT ABOUT YOU! // YOU CAN VIEW Naushena’S WORK ON THE WIRE’S DREAM 2ND COLLECTION RELEASED ON JUNE 30TH.

 

© 2017 | The Black Lion is a humble interdisciplinary journal that values your voice. Visit the submissions page to learn more about submitting to the Journal’s sections or to The Wire’s Dream Magazine. | Copyright Policy

 
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