Interview | Joyfrida Anindo On Compacting Emotion In Fiction & On Serving Her Community

The Wire's Dream | BL | Black Lion Journal | Black Lion

I am pleased and humbled to have interviewed Joyfrida Anindo for The Wire’s Dream 2nd Collection. Joyfrida is a writer who’s adept at compacting much emotion into a few words and sentences.

Joyfrida is a short story author and poet. She has work appearing in StoryZetu and several other blogs. When she’s not making strangers cry with her writing, she’s most likely at the office, reading a book, cooking, or hanging out with her progeny. // Joyfrida On Twitter and JoyWrite

CHRISTINA LYDIA
Thank you for taking your time to answer a few questions for us to know more about you and your writing. Let me start by asking about your love for writing. What drives you to write?

JOYFRIDA ANINDO
I am a very emotional person and always have feelings in me that have to be released. If I don’t write I feel emotionally clogged.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
How did you get started in writing? How do you make time to write?

Image of notebooks | Interview | Joyfrida Anindo On Compacting Emotion In Fiction & On Serving Her Community | BL | Black Lion Journal | Black Lion
“I have always wrote for as long as I can remember. It began as a stress reliever, I had several scrap books full of poems through elementary and high school.”

JOYFRIDA ANINDO
I have always wrote for as long as I can remember. It began as a stress reliever, I had several scrap books full of poems through elementary and high school. I was also the best creative writer in my class all though school and university. One time in 2005, a friend found my scrap book and they suggested that I start a blog. My mum is also a writer, not professionally, and I guess I just picked the gene, and with practice, became good at it. Early mornings and late evenings are my peak times. I create personal time during that time of the day to write or think about things that I might want to write about.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
What struck my attention the most about your writing was its sense of immediacy, presence, and emotion. I felt this especially when reading “Farewell Street.” You have a skill at compacting so much sentimentality in small moments that your writing often reminds me of what poetry is best known for. Is this a particular style that you have always used or did you learn to write this way?

JOYFRIDA ANINDO
My writing comes from a place of emotional density — it is a form of release. It is what I am feeling at that specific time, whether loss or heart break or pure joy and happiness. My pieces are all fiction but driven by true emotions. These emotions can be because of personal issues, what my friend(s) are going through, or what the world if going through.

“My writing comes from a place of emotional density — it is a form of release. It is what I am feeling at that specific time, whether loss or heart break or pure joy and happiness.”

CHRISTINA LYDIA
What quick tips do you have for writers who want to pack much emotion into short form fiction or into poetry?

JOYFRIDA ANINDO
Write at the height of that feeling. When you feel it most. Some pieces I have wrote through blurry eyes at the edge of crying. The words to describe a certain feeling come to me when I am feeling it. If I am not sad and try writing a sad story I never go past the third line and vice versa.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
How much of your personal life and experiences shape who you are as a writer and as a person? Do you find that you draw much content from your experiences or have you worked to keep that separate from your writing?

JOYFRIDA ANINDO
I believe it is hard for any writer to completely separate themselves from their writing but I try not to let it overtake what it is that I want to put across. If I will write anything that will touch my experience with someone or an experience that someone is going through, I always ask their permission. However, many times I make it as obscure as possible. All of my work is fiction but relatable.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
You mentioned to me that you are a program assistant at a humanitarian organization. Can you tell us a bit about what your organization is about and your role in it? How does working there shape the way you define yourself as a person and as a writer?

Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) | Interview | Joyfrida Anindo On Compacting Emotion In Fiction & On Serving Her Community | BL | Black Lion Journal | Black Lion
Mennonite Central Committee (MCC)

JOYFRIDA ANINDA
I work for Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) as an Admin and Program Assistant. MCC is a global, nonprofit Christian organization that works in relief, development and peace. I get to interact with different people in my country and across the globe. That has helped me avoid the danger of having one side of a story on any issue. I am able to balance my writing.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
Can you give us a few quick tips for those who are interested in knowing more about how to help and support humanitarian organizations?

JOYFRIDA ANINDO
Check out MCC’s website and see the amazing things that we are doing around the globe. I was quite the skeptic when it came to humanitarian work but now I see the many gaps that these organizations fill, not only in my country, but all over the world. Consider giving monetary assistance and/or your time. There are many activities that one can participate in around your area and/or around the world.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
I like to ask writers about their experience with blogging because I am interested in knowing how it shapes their writing. How has blogging impacted how you write? Do you feel that it has benefited you as a writer?

JOYFRIDA ANINDO
Yes, it has benefited me; you get constructive criticism on your work and also get to interact with a variety of writers across the globe. It however hasn’t changed my style of writing. Blogging and participating in blogging challenges helps one to practice their craft — the only way to become better at writing is writing more.

CHRISTINA LYDIA
What quick tips can you give novice writers who want to get started with blogging as a platform?

JOYFRIDA ANINDO
Write, follow other writers, comment on their pieces, interact, keep your blog active, and never give up. I blogged for a couple of years with zero followers before my blog finally picked up; you must be patient. Find that genre that you are good at and then practice, practice, and practice.

“Write at the height of that feeling. When you feel it most.”

CHRISTINA LYDIA
Where do you hope to you see yourself in 5 years, professionally and creatively?

JOYFRIDA ANINDO
Creatively, well, I would like to have an anthology of poetry and short fiction out by then. Even if it will be self-published. I also look forward to growing professionally in my field of work as a humanitarian worker.

BL | Black Lion Journal | Black Lion

THANK YOU, Joyfrida Anindo, FOR ALLOWING US TO KNOW A BIT ABOUT YOU! // YOU CAN VIEW Joyfrida’s WORK ON THE WIRE’S DREAM 2ND COLLECTION RELEASED ON JUNE 30TH.

 

© 2017 | The Black Lion is a humble interdisciplinary journal that values your voice. Visit the submissions page to learn more about submitting to the Journal’s sections or to The Wire’s Dream Magazine. | Copyright Policy

 
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