The Girl Who Stole The Apple by Peter Tickler Would Be Better If It Were Made Into A Television Show

Yes. That’s right. I said it.

For those who say “the book is better than (the movie) (the television show): Have you ever came across a book that you felt would be best suited in a different medium? No? There have been instances where television shows and/or films have produced a better experience for me than the reading of the book. I can think of one show that I can say I definitely thought was better than the book (The Vampire Diaries). The Girl Who Stole The Apple by Peter Tickler would be one of them if turned into a visual medium, such as a television show.

The Girl Who Stole the Apple's book cover is similar to Stephanie Meyer's Twilight cover.
The Girl Who Stole the Apple’s book cover is similar to Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight cover.
The Vampire Diaries's Elena Gilbert posing with brothers Stephen and Damon Salvatore.
The Vampire Diaries’s Elena Gilbert posing with brothers Stephen and Damon Salvatore.

What interested me the most when I saw The Girl Who Stole The Apple was the cover image. It reminded me of Twilight (NO I HAVE NOT READ THE SERIES NOR DO I PLAN ON READING IT ANYTIME SOON BECAUSE I ALREADY KNOW WHAT IT’S ABOUT PLUS I’M MORE INTO THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS AND SHOULD I REALLY SAY ANY MORE?). So, I believed it was a book aimed for a young adult audience. And I still consider myself a young adult — age now seems to be so varied that young adults can still be considered young even when near their thirties or over, though I’m not yet thirty (heck, you’re young if you feel young).

The book’s description implies that The Girl Who Stole The Apple is a story that involves a Snow White-like character set in modern day. This story is founded as a detective story and so is advertised as a thriller. Without much spoilers, we have a mysterious incident in the beginning that leads to a murder, an investigation with harsh cops, and a stereotypical back-and-forth hostile interview that got my blood running for reasons unrelated to this book.

We read multiple view points throughout, often jumping from scene to scene with a different character’s point of view or returning to where one character’s narrative left off.

This style of storytelling can work well for some readers, and most definitely works well for certain types of stories (Marissa Meyer’s The Lunar Chronicles comes to mind); however, for The Girl Who Stole The Apple, I felt it doesn’t work. To be quite polite, I felt disillusioned, often working to hold together what was going on, who was who all throughout, etc. This disillusionment definitely marked a negative reading experience for my part.

Broadchurch tv show on ITV. The Girl Who Stole The Apple would do good in modeling after this storytelling medium.
Broadchurch tv show on ITV. The Girl Who Stole The Apple would do good in modeling after this storytelling medium.

While expertly written, no doubt about that, it was a bit difficult to imagine what was going on, especially at the beginning. Yet, after the end of the first chapter, I knew I it would be an interesting book, nonetheless. Though wordy, I can say that Mr. Peter Tickler is a good storyteller and that The Girl Who Stole The Apple (no relation to The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo Series by Sieg Larson) is an appealing story, overall.

Yet while reading, I truly wished for this story to be translated as a television show someday. Honestly, I believe it is better suited for a visual medium — there are certain scenes that need to be “seen,” if you get my point, in order to be better understood. Being detailed enough, I could imagine that The Girl Who Stole The Apple has potential to be a great show, something in the style of Shetland or even Broadchurch. And on reading, you slowly learn how interweaved the character’s lives are to each other — you eventually see a family held together by secrets and you want to know how the little girl is involved throughout. This knowledge, however, is gained by meticulous attention to detail and to the character’s conversations — hard work for those who want to have an interesting thriller without a long contextual set up.

 
¡PSST! ©2016 The Black Lion Journal
P.S. Share by linking or by using the social media buttons below!

Advertisements

Discuss

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s