Inspiration for The Wire’s Dream: Manufacturing Significance

On April 9, 2016, I went to Thumbprint Gallery in La Jolla, Ca, to attend the opening reception for Manufacturing Significance, an exhibition in collaboration with So Say We All (SSWA). SSWA is a non-profit organization for the literary and performing arts who has established itself as one of San Diego’s best known resources for new and established writers. This time, the San Diego event hosted in Thumbprint Gallery’s showroom featured live readings on the hour.

Writers were paired with an original piece of art and asked to create a flash fiction response between 300 to 500 words. Needless to say, I was genuinely impressed at the range of creativity each writer took when writing their story.

Live Reading:

6 PM
Sara Morrison
Valerie Polichar
Jessica Hilt
Matt Lewis
Lauren Becker

7 PM
Tiffany Tang
Hari Alluri
Lizz Huerta
Matthew Baldwin
Ed Farragut

8 PM
Ryan Bradford
Gary Gould
Justin Hudnall
Julia Evans

I used my experience of this event–physically attending and what I imagined while listening to each story–to think about ways in which I could expand my creativity. I began searching old files of pictures that I took when I used to be more familiar with my camera. Pictures that I used as a reference when writing a response. I reflected, yes, on the memories they triggered. But I also let myself become a third person, which was much fun, and challenging, to do.


If you let things inspire you–even everyday things that may appear ordinary, not extraordinary–then your experience may give you motivation to create extraordinary work. Inspiration, as motivation, can be powerful.

This was the biggest lesson I learned — and the motivation for The Wire’s Dream: Anything can be used to manufacture significance, to create things that can become extra-ordinary. And most of all, inspiration is something that can be used as a motivation to get things started, whether it be a story draft or a list of ideas–whichever strikes your fancy.

When I took the much needed time to refocus and write into words The Black Lion’s purpose as its mission, goal, and credo, I wanted to extend that purpose toward something creative. The Wire’s Dream was an idea I’ve carried around in my head and a bit on paper since the beginning of TBL Journal in 2013. I refocused my idea to one that expresses creativity while also giving much needed space to those who want to show who they are and what they enjoy doing. I thought about Manufacturing Significance and understood that value is something that can be created and given. It’s also something that establishes meaning and shapes influence.

 
The Wire's Dream Logo

The Wire’s Dream has become The Black Lion Journal’s magazine of creativity that features content classified as Fiction, Poetry, Art, Photography, Creative Non-Fiction, and Combinación – a combination.

Whimsical, genre-bending; submissions that speak of true experience, passion, and inspiration; TBL Journal welcomes pieces for The Wire’s Dream that best merge classifications, that invite differing perspectives or world views on everyday experience, that challenge traditional views of “good” literature, and that show creativity in varying, sometimes unusual, ways. Your best work is always welcomed — work that showcases who you are, where you come from, and what you love to do.

 
¡PSST! © 2016 The Black Lion Journal

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